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Trenitalia
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Deutsche Bahn
SNCF
Stations

Important Stations and Airports for this Journey

Turin
Torino Porta Nuova
Amenities
Torino Porta Susa Sotterranea
Amenities
Torino (C.so V.emanuele Ii,131h/autostazione)
Amenities
Turin
Amenities
Refreshments
WC

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the airport and what is the best way to get there?
SADEM shuttle service operates between airport and Turin city center. The bus also stops at Torino Porta Nuova railway station.
Torino City
Amenities

Walking Around in Turin

Visit the lovely city of Turin, a place that still carries a certain old-fashioned Italian charm. The center of Turin offers plenty of sights to see within walking distance. Start with a stroll towards one of the oldest parks in the city, Parco del Valentino, which has a lovely botanical garden. There's even a small medieval village to explore while you're there. Or do some shopping along Via Roma towards Piazza Castello. This street offers prime luxury and boutique shops, from top Italian designers to famed international brands. There are also plenty of great restaurants along this street to stop for a tasty lunch. Keep walking up the Via Roma until you reach the Piazza San Carlo, the famous 17th century plaza that's been the stomping ground of artists and intellectuals for centuries. Here you can have a coffee while admiring the statue in its center. If you have time, make sure to visit San Carlo or Santa Cristina, the two stunning 16th century cathedrals that face the plaza, known as the "twin churches" for their placement in the popular square. 

Eating in Turin

Turin, the main city of Piedmont in the far north of Italy, has a local cuisine that is unique from the Mediterranean style visitors might associate with Italian gastronomy. You can see the Alps from Turin, and the city's culinary inclinations are towards rich dairy dishes, and hearty, warming fare with more widespread use of lamb than you would find further south. This is a region with around 50 distinct varieties of cheese. A Torinese classic dish is agnolotti, small ravioli stuffed with minced lamb, sometimes served in a light broth. The Slow Food movement began in Piedmont, and local chefs pride themselves on using locally sourced produce such as rice and the prized white truffle. The Po Valley of Piedmont has a large number of rice paddies, growing the fine arborio rice used for risotto, often cooked with wild porcini mushrooms and truffles in season. For Italian children, on the other hand, Turin is synonymous with chocolate. The city is home to major confectioners like Ferrero and Caffarel, while the stylish Turin coffee houses invariably offer delicious gianduiotti, or pralines, to accompany a macchiato. The arcades of the city center have numerous patisseries and chocolatiers offering elegant creations to entice tourists and locals alike.