About Reykjavík

Located not far from the arctic circle, Reykjavík is the northernmost capital of a sovereign state and an increasingly popular tourist destination. The city is believed to be site of the first permanent settlement in Iceland, which is said to have been established around AD 870 by Ingólfur Arnarson. However, there was a lack of urban development in the area until the 18th century. Reykjavík was actually founded in 1786 as an official trading town. Growing steadily over the next decades, the city became a regional and national centre of culture, commerce and politics. The name comes for vapors of the hot springs, and in Icelandic it means 'smoky bay'. It is one of the cleanest, greenest, and safest cities in the world.

Quick Guide to Reykjavík

Must Know: The best way of seeing the city is by foot. The public transport system only consists of buses.

Must See: Climb up to the top of Hallgrimskirkja and look out over the views of downtown Reykjavik.

Must Do: Check out the wildlife with a whale watching tour from the pier.

Did You Know: Reykjavík is the most northern capital city in the world.

How to Get to Reykjavík

Keflavík International Airport is the largest airport in Iceland and serves as the main hub for international transport. It can be found on the Reykjanes Peninsula, near the town of Keflavik, which is about 50 kilometers from Reykjavík. Buses from Airport express and Flybus offer a service daily between the city centre and the airport. The buses run every 30 minutes and should be reserved in advance. Taking a taxi to or from the airport to central Reykjavík is the fastest but also the more expensive way, and usually costs around €100 to €150 depending on occupancy. Taxis can be hailed directly at the airport or from the city centre.

Reykjavík Airport is the second airport servicing the Icelandic capital and is the most centrally located. It is located two kilometers from the city but it only operates a select number of domestic flights and flights to Greenland and the Faroe Islands. A few international charter and private flights are sometimes also available from here. The major bus terminal BSÍ is located just beside the airport offering the best connections. City services are provided by Strætó while Iceland Excursions' Airport Express and Reykjavík Excursions Kynnisferðir's Flybus offer regular connections between Keflavík International Airport and Reykjavík Airport. The close proximity of the airport makes it an easy connection for taxis, and you can hail a cab anywhere in the city or at the airport itself without pre booking. Drivers will be able to easily access the airport from the city centre as it is located only about 2 km away.

BSÍ is the main bus terminal in Iceland, and is conveniently located in the city centre. Connections across Iceland as well as local journeys often start or end here. Major bus providers include Strætó, the FlyBus and other Reykjavík Excursions buses. The Strætó Route 1 bus (the Ring Road) is available at the terminal. This route runs through the city outskirts and connects Reykjavík to the rest of Iceland.


Getting Around Reykjavík

The public transport in Reykjavík consists solely of buses. Public buses are operated under Strætó and offer connections within the city as well as to other destinations.

Bicycling is an excellent way to discover Reykjavík, and Iceland as a whole. Within the city there are bike lanes, often located close to the pedestrian lanes. Cycling outside of the city, especially in the summer, is also very popular for adventure enthusiasts. Even though Icelanders are some of the most prolific drivers, traffic in Reykjavík is usually sparse in comparison to the rest of Europe. There may be a little congestion at times, especially in the evenings on the weekends when people are heading to the city centre to socialise, but it is usually nothing too bad. As a whole, Icelandic drivers are usually respectful of traffic laws.

Reykjavík is a great size to explore on foot, and it is easy to do so. As there is not an overabundance of traffic or congestion, the city is very pedestrian friendly and walking can sometimes be the fastest way to get to different points in the city.

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How to travel to Reykjavík

The most convenient way to travel to Reykjavík is by taking a flight. There are direct flights from the UK to Reykjavík from cities such as London, Belfast, Edinburgh, Bristol, Manchester, Birmingham and Glasgow. Indirect flights are also offered from the UK to Iceland's capital city. Keflavík International Airport is the largest airport in Iceland and serves as the main hub for international transport. It can be found on the Reykjanes Peninsula, near the town of Keflavik, which is about 31 miles from Reykjavík.

Looking to catch the bus from the airport to the city centre? Find out all the information you need to know and book your bus ticket from Keflavík airport to Reykjavík city centre.

 

FAQ's About Travelling to Reykjavík

What’s the weather in Reykjavík like?

Reykjavík's temperature peaks in July and August with 13°C as the average temperature. At this time of year, the hours of sunlight also peak with 24 hours a day. Due to its proximity to the arctic circle, winters in Iceland can be rather chilly. January is the coldest month of the year, with an average low of -3°C degrees, with no sunlight and plenty of snow.

When is the cheapest time to book a trip to Reykjavík?

The cheapest month to book a flight to Reykjavík is November and early December.

What can’t you miss out on in Reykjavík?

Iceland's coastal capital is the perfect spot to do some whale watching. For those who prefer dry land, the city is filled with mueseums. Plus, the blue lagoon is located in the centre of town!

Which airlines fly to Reykjavík from the UK?

There are three airlines which offer direct flights from the UK, they are easyJet, WOW air and Icelandair.

Will I need my passport to enter Iceland?

Iceland joined the Schengen acquis in 2001, which means passengers will not be asked for I.D upon arrival. However, officials from Keflavík International Airport heavily recommend travellers to bring their passports.
 

How to get around Reykjavík

The public transport in Reykjavík consists solely of buses. Public buses are operated under Strætó and offer connections within the city as well as to other destinations.

Bicycling is an excellent way to discover Reykjavík, and Iceland as a whole. Within the city there are bike lanes, often located close to the pedestrian lanes. Cycling outside of the city, especially in the summer, is also very popular for adventure enthusiasts. Even though Icelanders are some of the most prolific drivers, traffic in Reykjavík is usually sparse in comparison to the rest of Europe. There may be a little congestion at times, especially in the evenings on the weekends when people are heading to the city centre to socialise, but it is usually nothing too bad. As a whole, Icelandic drivers are usually respectful of traffic laws.

Reykjavík is a great size to explore on foot, and it is easy to do so. As there is not an overabundance of traffic or congestion, the city is very pedestrian friendly and walking can sometimes be the fastest way to get to different points in the city.

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Important Stations and Airports for this Journey

Reykjavík
Reykjavik Domestic
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