About Edinburgh

Often referred to as the 'Athens of the North' Edinburgh is a heady blend of impressive architecture and landmarks like Edinburgh Castle, St. Giles Cathedral and Holyrood Palace sit alongside green spaces, parks and gardens. The leafy Georgian terraces of the New Town with their upmarket boutiques are worlds away from the cobbled alleys of the Grassmarket with its iconic tenements. Scotland's capital is a city of contrasts where excellent shopping and entertainment facilities and traditional Scots bonhomie go hand in hand.

Quick Guide to Edinburgh

Must Know Save a few pounds and book your ticket to the Edinburgh to save money, and to guarantee you’ll see all your favourite acts at the festival!
Must See Big acts at this year’s festival include comedy trio Foil Arm and Hogs, Scotland-loved duo Burnistoun, and one of Foster’s nominees from last year James Acaste returns with a new show!
Must Do Catch the sights outside of the Edinburgh Fringe epicentre as museums and attractions are particular empty at this time.
Must Eat Try a Hot Roast Roll at Oink! Located in the Old Town, you’ll find tucking into pulled pork, haggis and apple sauce served in freshly made rolls might by the peak of your trip.
Did You Know At Edinburgh Fringe 2015 there were 50,459 performances of 3,314 shows in 313 venues, making it the largest arts festival in the world!

How to Get to Edinburgh

Flying into Edinburgh Airport

Edinburgh Airport is the busiest airport in Scotland, seeing approximately 9.8 million passengers pass through in 2013 - making it also the 5th busiest in the UK per passenger numbers. Offering a number of domestic and international flights, the airports has its roots based in the Turnhouse Aerodrome, which was an airfield used in WWI. It located about 9.3 km (5.8 mi) from the city centre in Ingliston.

Getting from Edinburgh Airport to the City Centre

Since 2014, trams are available offering passengers transport to the city centre. The Edinburgh Airport Tram offers interchanges with rail services at Edinburgh Park and Haymarket stations.as well as stops at Murrayfield Stadium and Princes Street.

The Airlink 100 express bus also runs to the city centre, dropping passengers off at Waverley Bridge, near to Princes Street. The bus leaves every 10 minutes and is about a 30 minute journey. Tickets can be purchased at the desk, on the us, or in advanced only for £4 single and £7 return. Concessions are available for children.

For taxis, official Edinburgh cabs can be pre-booked in advance with Edinburgh City Private Hire online, by phone or at their desk in the Domestic Arrivals hall. Edinburgh Black cabs can also be hired on the spot from taxi ranks at the terminals. The journey by taxi takes around 25 minutes to the city centre and costs around £20+.

Those looking to drive to or from the airport, it can be reached by the A8 Glasgow Road and is close to the M8 and M9 motorways, which offer connections to the city centre. The A8 airport junction can be found between the Gogar and Newbridge roundabouts. The postcode for sat nav users is EH12 9DN.

Trains to Edinburgh Waverley Station

Waverley Station is the main railway station in Edinburgh, and is the second largest train station by size behind London Waterloo in the UK. It is also the second busiest railway station in Scotland after Glasgow, with around 20 million passengers passing through annually.

Getting from Edinburgh Waverley Station to the City Centre

The station is considered to be in the centre of the city, and is found in the valley between the Old Town and the New Town. Princes Street, which is a famous shopping street in the city centre, is within walking distance on the north side of the station. Bus lines 3, 29, 30, 31, 33, 37, 51, 52, 62A, N3, N30, N31, N37, X29, X31, X37, X55, X61 and X95 stop at the station. Major rail providers that service the station are Cross Country, East Coast, First TransPennine Express, ScotRail, and Virgin Trains.

A taxi rank can be found on Waverley Bridge, as the taxi rank within the station is currently closed. For drivers, cars are not allowed into the station anymore, but pick-up and drop off points include: Calton Rd - sat nav postcode EH8 8DL, Market St - EH1 1DE, and the New St car park (free for 30 minutes) - EH8 8BH.

Trains to Haymarket Station

Known just as 'Haymarket', this station is the second busiest in Edinburgh and is located near the city centre in the West End. A major commuter hub, the station offers city connections as well as long distance train services to Glasgow and London. With 5 platforms, Haymarket has over 2 million passengers passing through it annually. Major providers at the station include First ScotRail, Crosscountry, First TransPennine Express, Virgin Trains, East Coast, and Edinburgh Trams.

Getting from Haymarket Station to the City Centre

The station is in the West End, which is near the city centre. Lothian Buses operate services within the city, and offer connections to points further in the city centre. Bus lines 12, 20, 21, 21A, 22, 26, 31, 100, 900, 904, N26, X6. X12. X20, X36 and tramway line T50 stop at the station. Taxis are available on a taxi rank outside the station. As it is a key station in the West End, taxis from anywhere in the city can easily find their way here and will be available near the station. The address for the station is Haymarket Terrace Edinburgh EH12 5EY for sat nav users, though there is no large or designated parking available in the station itself.

Buses to Edinburgh Bus Station

Edinburgh Bus Station is the main station for local bus interchanges and coach services further abroad within the city. It was opened originally as St. Andrew Square bus station in 1957, but reopened in its current state (with its current name) in 2003. It is located on Elder street in the city centre near to Waverley Station. Main bus providers at the station include Lothian Buses, First Edinburgh, Stagecoach Fife, Scottish Citylink, Perryman's Buses, Megabus, and Prentice Westwood.

Getting from Edinburgh Bus Station to the City Centre

Many local buses stop at this station. Additionally, it is served by the St. Andrew Square tram stop on Edinburgh trams, as well as by trains at Waverley Station which is 200 metres away. There is no parking at the station, and the pedestrian access is located at Elder Street and St. Andrew Square. If arriving by car, it is best drive to Waverly Station and walk from there.

Driving to Edinburgh

Driving in Scotland is more or less the same as in the rest of the UK, with the cars driving on the left side of the road. Unless posted, the standard speed limit throughout Scotland is 30 mph on local and city roads, 60 mph outside built up areas, and 70 mph on motorways and dual carriageways. You can drive to Edinburgh using the M8, M9, or A702.

How to Get Around Edinburgh

Public Transport in Edinburgh

Local transport includes buses from Lothian Buses and First Edinburgh, national rail train services, and the Edinburgh Tram. Lothian Buses and Edinburgh Tram work together under Transport for Edinburgh to provide the public transit in the city. The combined Transport for Edinburgh network covers the city including the city centre, as well as outer areas and transport to further destinations such as Glasgow and London. There are two zones here: the City Zone (everything except the airport), and the Airport Zone. Edinburgh Tram tickets can be purchased in advance or from vending machines at the tram stops. Local bus tickets can be purchased in advance, through their app, or from the bus driver on the bus when paying with exact change.

  • Public Transport Provider: Transport for Edinburgh (www.transportforedinburgh.com/)
  • Cost of a Ticket: This will vary according to which services you are taking, what time of day or night, the destination, and whether you are travelling one way or return. A single day fare is usually around £1.50 in the City Zone (excludes the airport) for both the tram and buses. A Family Day Ticket costs £7.50, and is good for unlimited travel for 2 adults and 2 children during the day. A single all day ticket for adults is £3.50, and a night all day ticket for adults is £3.00.
  • Discounted Ticket Types: Two children under 5 years can ride for free, children 5-15 must purchase children's tickets. Students can travel with a £1 flat fee if they hold a Transport Scotland Young Persons Bus Concession Cards (ages 16 to 18 inclusive). Seniors holding a Scottish National Entitlement Card can ride day buses for free.
  • Availability of Public Transport at Night: Night bus services are available but usually require a different ticket than a single Day Bus ticket. The first tram services begin after 5am and the last trams leave their terminus stations before midnight.

Cycling in Edinburgh

Cycling is very popular as the city is very bicycle friendly. However, as the weather in Scotland can be unpredictable, proper gear is always recommended. There are traffic free bike lanes throughout the city that take advantage of old railway lines, and cyclists can share the bus lanes.

  • Rental Costs: There is no city sponsored cycle share programme, however many bike shops rent out bikes. Bike Hire from The Tartan Bicycle Company in the city centre starts at around £20 for a single day, and about £70-80 for a week.

Taxis in Edinburgh

Taxis are available in Edinburgh and 'Black Cabs' similar to the ones in London can be found here, accommodating up to 5 people. Taxi ranks at train stations and popular spots may be the best place to grab a taxi in the evenings, but taxis can be hailed from the street. You can pre-book taxis online or by phone easily.

  • Cost: A 10 minute journey in the city centre will cost around £5-6, excluding tip.

Driving in Edinburgh

Many people use the local transport but there are car parks scattered about the city as well as on street parking, and the connections to the motorways makes travel by car an easy option within Scotland. The most congested times to drive in the city are from around 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:00 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. In the city centre, on street parking costs around £3.20 per hour. Parking in car parks and further out offers lower prices that can vary.

Walking Around Edinburgh

Walking is a great way to get around the city especially as the city centre has been developed specifically with priority for pedestrian traffic. A nice ramble may include walking up to Arthur's seat as well as stroll down Prince's Street. There are a number of scenic walks within the city as well as pedestrian only areas.

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About Edinburgh

Often referred to as the 'Athens of the North' Edinburgh is a heady blend of impressive architecture and landmarks like Edinburgh Castle, St. Giles Cathedral and Holyrood Palace sit alongside green spaces, parks and gardens. The leafy Georgian terraces of the New Town with their upmarket boutiques are worlds away from the cobbled alleys of the Grassmarket with its iconic tenements. Scotland's capital is a city of contrasts where excellent shopping and entertainment facilities and traditional Scots bonhomie go hand in hand.

Quick Guide to Edinburgh

Must Know Book your transport to Edinburgh early to save money on your fare to the capital of the north!
Must See Big acts at this year’s festival include comedy trio Foil Arm and Hogs, Scotland-loved duo Burnistoun, and one of Foster’s nominees from last year James Acaste returns with a new show!
Must Do Make sure to catch the sights outside of the Edinburgh Fringe epicentre as museums and attractions are particular empty at this time.
Must Eat Try a Hot Roast Roll at Oink! Located in the Old Town, you’ll find tucking into pulled pork, haggis and apple sauce served in freshly made rolls should be the peak of your trip.
Did You Know At Edinburgh Fringe 2015 there were 50,459 performances of 3,314 shows in 313 venues, making it the largest arts festival in the world!

Top Experiences in Edinburgh

Greyfriars Graveyard

Known to supernatural-fanatics as the world’s most ghost infested graveyard. The majority of these spooky tales originate from the middle ages, but if you’re looking for something different to do there are plenty of companies that offer tours of this graveyard.


Edinburgh Castle

A prominent feature of the city, Edinburgh Castle is not only home to Scotland’s crown jewels, but a vast amount of history. In its 1110 years of existing, we recommend taking the time to check the castle out, and enjoy the views from the top!



Stations

Important Stations and Airports for this Journey

Edinburgh
Kingsknowe
Amenities
Edinburgh Waverley
Amenities
Refreshments
WC

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the train station and what is the best way to get there?
This station is within walking distance of the city centre and is connected to other parts of the city by public transport.
Brunstane
Amenities
Slateford
Amenities
Edinburgh
Amenities
Refreshments
WC

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the bus station and what is the best way to get there?
This station is within walking distance of the city centre and is connected to other parts of the city by public transport.
Edinburgh
Amenities
Refreshments
Wifi
WC

Frequently Asked Questions

Where is the airport and what is the best way to get there?
Public transportation to and from the Edinburgh Airport and Edinburgh city centre is serviced by the Airlink 100 coach.

Walking Around in Edinburgh

Walking around the center of Edinburgh can be breathtaking, both in terms of the spectacular views offered from the capital's vantage points, and the occasionally steep slopes and stairways between levels in the Old Town. Central Edinburgh is relatively compact, making it easy to explore on foot. An obvious starting point in the medieval Old Town is the Royal Mile, which is actually a little longer than a mile. It is a cobbled street stretching from the Castle on its lofty rock, down to the Queen's Edinburgh residence Holyrood Palace, surrounded by parkland and the distinctive crag of Arthur's Seat. The broad avenue of Princes Street is the city's main shopping area, with side streets offering alluring views down to the Firth of Forth. A stroll north from here leads to the elegant squares and crescents of the New Town, showcasing some of the UK's finest Georgian architecture, and then to Stockbridge, one of Edinburgh's coolest neighborhoods, with colorful cafes, a gourmet street market, galleries and the pretty Water of Leith walkway. If your feet get tired or it starts to rain, Edinburgh's modern tram system offers an ideal alternative for exploring the city.

Eating in Edinburgh

It's not an overstatement to suggest that dining out in Edinburgh has undergone something of a revolution over the last decade. The Scottish capital has become one of the culinary hotspots in the UK, thanks to Michelin star chefs including Tom Kitchin, Martin Wishart and Paul Kitching. Their innovative approach to the finest Scottish game and seafood has popularized fine dining in Edinburgh. Fashionable Scandinavian  influences have reached Edinburgh, notably in the acclaimed Timberyard, while the city has also been quick to welcome the trend for American smokehouses and barbecue joints. Vegans and vegetarians will find that the city offers a diverse and cosmopolitan selection of meat-free dining options. Fast food aficionados are also spoiled for choice in Edinburgh, with independent  burger joints such as Bread Meats Bread, offering a fresh take on the American diner favorite. The traditional Edinburgh fish and chips restaurants and takeaways retain a loyal following with their diverse selection of deep fried dishes, including very Scottish haggis and white pudding,  usually accompanied by the city's distinctive brown sauce.  Edinburgh's long-established Italian community means that the city still offers several old-school  family trattorias  welcoming children, usually with an extensive ice cream menu.